ADC2
Alternative Desert Cities 2
Johnson Perspective Unit

Alternative Desert Cities 2

Interior perspective of a double height housing unit tucked into the landscape by student Amberley JohnsonInterior perspective of a double height housing unit tucked into the landscape by student Amberley JohnsonInterior perspective of a double height housing unit tucked into the landscape by student Amberley JohnsonInterior perspective of a double height housing unit tucked into the landscape by student Amberley Johnson

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QTCT is tasked to blend these two identities onto one site—a give and take relationship between beach ambitions and urban necessities. QTCT is a sampling of two worlds: on one hand it is the embodiment of the language of the beach and on the other it is a detailed and exacting built urban space.
Planes, frames, and volumes are fundamentals to all assembly logics. With the proliferation of additive production methods, the possibility of volumetric prefabricated components has the potential to radically alter the way that we conceive of construction and the permanence of building parts.
Coney Island will remain a MUTANT appendage at the farthest shore of New York City. Coney is an agglomeration of all of its histories and should continue to simultaneously move each agenda forward. Coney will continue to evolve through mutations— this vision will accelerate its hybridity.
The RACA project must meet two demands: A. REFLECTION (museum) or B. CONTINUATION (practice + addition). The current program and its stagnancy has left the site forgotten—it is a typical static museum on a living site. The site and addition must constantly change through the participation of people.
Seeing Park Avenue as an underutilized zone that connects four vibrant neighborhoods from 42nd Street to 144th Street, Infrastructural Infill is a study testing the potential to locate a combination of mixed-use housing and transportation in the residual spaces caused by urban infrastructure.
University Island is a swirling shapeshifter, in both the landscape and the architecture, that offers it’s undefined field of opportunities to the students and anticipates that each will discover and produce their own individual relationship with the island and their education.
Utilizing built form as a strategic carrier of culture in opposition of the status quo, the Hellinikon project links the disconnected suburban mountain communities to the east with the sea to the west while splitting the Hellinikon International Airport and Olympic Park into distinct zones.
The GBN project sites itself as this link connecting the busiest night life district and revitalized neighborhood park in the north, the largest beach front in the city to the south, and establishes the cities first large public plaza and recreation fields adjacent to the new building.

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